Tuesday, July 22, 2014

EclipseFP 2.6.1 released!

I've just released EclipseFP 2.6.1. EclipseFP is a set of Eclipse plugins for Haskell development. This is a bug fixing release, mainly for GHC 7.8 support.

Release notes can be found here.

As usual, download from http://eclipsefp.sf.net/updates.

Happy Haskell Hacking!

Sunday, July 20, 2014

BuildWrapper/EclipseFP and GHC 7.8

I've been working on some issues related to GHC 7.8 in BuildWrapper and EclipseFP. On the EclipseFP side, mainly the quickfixes are affected, because EclipseFP parses the GHC error messages to offer them, and the quotes characters have changed in the GHC 7.8 messages.

On the BuildWrapper side, things are more complex. Adapting to API changes wasn't a big deal, but it seems that GHC bugs involving the GHC API, static linking and other unknowns cause some things to break. The solution I've found was to build BuildWrapper with the -dynamic flag. But I couldn't upload this to hackage because Cabal thinks that -dynamic is a debug flag (it starts with d). I've sent a bug fix to Cabal, so in the next release that'll be fixed. So if you're using GHC 7.8 and BuildWrapper, you may want to rebuild the executable with -dynamic (uncomment the relevant line in the cabal file).

Note: BuildWrapper comes with a comprehensive test suite (90 tests covering all aspects). So you can always build the tests and run them to ensure everyting is OK on your system.

Happy Haskell Hacking!

Saturday, June 28, 2014

EclipseFP reaches 100 stars!

This week, the EclipseFP github project reached a hundred stars! Thanks to all users and contributors!! I know still a lot of work is needed to make EclipseFP even better (and faster (-:), so please do not hesitate to participate, on the Eclipse side, on the Haskell side, or on the documentation!

Happy Haskell Hacking!

Tuesday, June 10, 2014

EclipseFP 2.6.0 released!

It's my pleasure to announce the release of EclipseFP 2.6.0. EclipseFP is a set of Eclipse plugins for Haskell development.
The full release notes can be found here. Of particular interest is :

  • Support for cabal 1.18 sandboxes
  • Worksheet for live programming (like GHCi expressions but automatically refreshed on save)
As usual, just install by pointing your Eclipse to http://eclipsefp.sf.net/.

Happy Haskell Hacking!


Tuesday, March 11, 2014

Reflecting on Ubuntu

It's been a while now since I moved to Ubuntu as my Haskell development OS. On the whole working in Ubuntu is a pleasant experience. I adapted easily to the UI, the support groups have loads of answers when I have an issue, and things usually install well, be it Haskell libraries or additional tools. I like that 99% of the time the upgrades do not require a restart. I have a few gripes, though.

  • Eclipse is not always stable and crashes from time to time (a couple of times a week), say. I haven't found any fix for that yet. It seems to be a UI library issue, maybe something to do with SWT. 
  • Maybe it's linked, but I've had some cases where Eclipse seemed to starve the machine of resources, and it was a huge pain to kill it. In Windows I go Ctrl-Alt-Del and kill the process via the task manager, and that's not an issue. On Ubuntu going Ctrl-Alt-F1 to go to another session, login, find the process and kill it tooks ages. I tried to change to setting to forbid an application to take to much resources but I don't think it helped. There's maybe another way to kill a misbehaving application that I'd love to know...
  • There are still some rough edges for things that should be simple. I can't get my printer to work (a run of the mill Canon printer), and there's a limit to the number of hours I'm willing to spend on getting something stupid like that to work. The other day RhythmBox (the software that apparently tries to play my CDs) crashed repeatedly after the first song on a CD that plays fine on Windows (maybe RhythmBox doesn't like Michael Schenker?). Seriously? Playing a CD is too hard?
So in the end, after hearing for years that Windows was not a great OS, I don't find Ubuntu that more stable or solid. I love not to be on a third-grade OS for Haskell libraries, don't get me wrong, so I'll stick with it, and hopefully the issues will go away!

Friday, February 14, 2014

Hidden Markov Models for Natural Language Tagging, in Haskell

I became intrigued in Hidden Markov Models after reading Kurzweil, who claims they can be used to model the thinking process in the brain. There is much debate about that, but these are interesting AI structures. This page I think has a good introduction.

I was working though the (partial) online book on Natural Language Processing with Haskell, and thought of combining the two. I used Mike Izbicki's hmm library for a one order Hidden Markov Model implementation. Once I initialized the model properly using the training data, I got around 91% accuracy on tagging, which is on par with the rules based approach presented in the nlpwp book.

I used the strategy outline in this paper to deal with unknown words (words in the test set not met in the training set): replace these words with a token that is also used for low frequency words in the training set. So far I've used only one token but I suppose being a bit more fined grained (to distinguish words starting with a capital letter, currency amounts, numbers) will improve results.

Performance is not very good even with some parallelism, so I think I need to spend more time on it, but it's definitely encouraging. It'll be a little bit of time till I have a thinking brain, though, but there is hope!

Sunday, February 02, 2014

Beginning Haskell: the Book!

It's my pleasure to relay the news of the publication of a new Haskell book, Beginning Haskell. It's written by one of EclipseFP contributors, Alejandro, and I've had the pleasure to be a technical reviewer of the book. I learned a lot, so I can heartily recommend it! It takes the reader from the very basics of functional programming to some intermediate and advanced Haskell techniques. Alejandro of course talks about it better than me.

Happy Haskell Reading! Thanks Alejandro for the great work!